Improve Your Emails for Better Usability Test Responses

Conducting usability tests requires usability testers—a group of people that matches your ideal user as closely as possible in terms of demographics and knowledge level.

Identifying those potential testers can be tough (and we’ll have some tips on how to do that coming out shortly), but even after you know who they are there’s still an additional challenge: getting them to respond.

Here are a few tips for improving your usability test request emails, getting you a better response rate and more accurate, actionable results.

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Why you should always prototype & user test multiple designs

5,127. That’s the number of prototypes that James Dyson claims to have created trying to perfect his bagless vacuum cleaner. Five thousand, one hundred and twenty seven. You see designing stuff is a messy business. Some ideas work out, some don’t. It’s only through a certain amount of trial and error (or in James Dyson’s case, a lot of trial and error), that you end up with a great design. This is why it’s so important to always, always prototype and user test multiple designs.

Why prototype and user test multiple designs?

Here are 10 (yes 10!) good reasons why you can’t afford not to prototype and user test multiple designs.

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Demographics are Key to Unlocking Usability Test Returns

As explained in a previous post, finding usability testers who best represent the target users of your software or app is an essential first step in making sure your usability test delivers useful results. Finding testers with the right knowledge level and experience gives you far more accurate results, and the more specialized your target niche is the more important a well-matched group becomes.

Expertise is just one element of your usability group that needs to match your target audience, though. Demographics—age, culture, and in some cases gender and more—are also important considerations.

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The First Rule of Usability Testing: Test the Right Users

OK, so the real first rule of usability testing is, “do it.” But we can assume you already know that usability testing is important, and that you need to be doing it in order to make sure your apps and software are creating value for your users—and thus for you—as efficiently as possible.

Given that, the most important consideration when it comes to usability testing is making sure your testers can give you the information you need.

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The Power of Words in UX Research

It’s said that a picture paints a thousand words. But it’s also worth considering that a single word can evoke a powerful image. Consider, for example, what comes to mind when you encounter the word ‘gambling.’ Alternatively, consider the word ‘gaming.’ Likely, different mental images are triggered by each word. Every day, during the course of verbal and written discourse, people have a choice of words to pick from. And it turns out that which words are used can have a significant impact on how the message is received, or the question is interpreted.

Consider, for example, the following pairs of words:

  • Liberal v. progressive
  • Liquor v. spirits
  • Used v. pre-owned

Although the words in each pair are similar to each other, I suspect that each word in the pair brings to mind a slightly different mental image, along with a slightly different emotional response, as well.

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Usability test questions: does wording matter?

Interaction Designers have a tough job. Designing is hard work! It requires the ability to be simultaneously creative and analytical – not an easy thing. When I changed jobs from being an Interaction Designer to being a UX Researcher, I initially assumed I would escape the rigors of the design role. However, I quickly realized that to be a good researcher, I had to have good research design skills. To get good research outcomes, you need to design effective research studies.

I also realized that, just like in interaction design, there are multiple ways to design in order to achieve a given objective. Each design option has a set of tradeoffs – each has its own strengths and weaknesses. Indeed, I have come to the conclusion that there is no such thing as a perfect design. But even so, a critical requirement of an effective research design is that it addresses and manages potential bias that can leak into a study and potentially skew or pollute research findings.

It’s important for UX researchers to be sensitive to the many ways that bias can affect a study, and to the extent possible, control for it. A key aspect of research design is how we craft the questions asked of research participants. It turns out that how we ask a question has critical implications for how a participant responds, and consequently, on research outcomes.

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6 common challenges in managing UX projects and how to overcome them

As of today, Ive been involved in Web and UX design for 12 years. The last three of them have been shared with my partners at Continuum, leading UX projects for a wide range of clients. Its impossible not to notice certain patterns on how user experience projects wind up, regardless of the scope, the team size or even the deadline and the budget.

These patterns, and the continuous iteration on how to better deal with them, have led us to identify some principles that pave the way to a better experience design. Well talk about them in a future post. But first, lets talk a bit about the most common problems we have faced when doing UX:

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Usability vs. A/B testing – which one should you use?

These days, I see a lot of people arguing over the type of testing procedures they should follow – Usability testing or A/B testing. Honestly, I find this argument quite vague. In fact, it’s not an argument at all, because, they serve completely different purposes.  We need to clearly understand which one is required when.  Let’s begin by diving into what is what and when you should go for them.

A/B Testing is what you should perform when you have two different designs (A and B), both having certain benefits, but you need to know which one has an edge over the other, or which one has a higher conversion rate.  Let’s put it this way – If you are looking for answers to questions like “Which design results in the most click-throughs by users?” or “Which design layout results in more sales?” or “Which e-mail campaign performs better?”, etc., an A/B Test is what you should go for.  A/B Testing is an effective way of testing how certain design changes (small or big) in the existing product can produce an impact on your returns.  The main advantage of performing such a test is that you can compare between two versions of the same product where the difference in design elements can be as nominal as the color of a particular CTA button or as massive as being completely different from each other.

On the other hand, if you’re looking for answers to questions like “Can users successfully complete the given task?” or “Is the navigation smooth as butter?” or “Do certain elements distract the user from their end goal?” -  Basically anything related to ease of use; Usability Testing is what you should go for.  Unlike A/B Testing, Usability Testing provides insights into user performance metrics rather than establishing the fact which design (A or B) is better.  The coolest thing about usability testing is that you can perform it on designs having any degree of fidelity – ranging from wireframes to high fidelity mockups, or even the actual finished product.  It’s completely up to you.

A/B Testing is quantitative in nature, i.e., it focuses on the “How Many”, whereas Usability Testing is qualitative in nature, i.e., it focuses on the ‘Why’.

While Usability Testing may require you to recruit participants, script your tasks and questions, analyze and make design recommendations based on your findings, A/B Testing requires no such efforts. A/B Testing allows you test your designs with real time traffic.  This sort of a test is performed on a live site, where an equal percentage of people/users are directed towards either designs and the number of click throughs and successful conversions from each design are recorded.  The results are then analyzed to determine which design trumps over the other.

Concluding, I’d like to say that it is very important to understand what type of test is required when.  Not knowing would result in costing you a lot of money, time and effort.  It is often recommended to pair one up with the other.  Why? Well, the benefits have no limits.  You can conduct usability tests to collect inputs (qualitative in nature) from the users and use A/B Tests to get insights into what can your possible design alternatives be or which alternative performs the best.  Conducting a Usability Test also ensures that there is no guess work involved in designing each of the design alternatives, and hence the designs tend to be bulletproof.

Arijit Banerjee is a UI & UX Enthusiast.  Although a power systems engineer by education, he has always found himself inclined toward the world of UX.  He has been associated with several firms and has helped define experiences across a wide range of products.  Apart from that, he’s a terrible singer, a dog lover, and an out and out foodie with decent culinary skills.  You can visit his website or follow him on Twitter.

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