New Website, New Pricing

Welcome to the new Loop11 website. As part of recent and on-going improvements to Loop11, we’ve given the Loop11 website a complete re-design. The new website looks better than ever and is easier to use. It also includes a new introduction video on our homepage. If you haven’t already seen it, check it out.

As part of the new website launch, we have also added a new “Bulk Buy” pricing model. We have recieved many requests from our members about bulk buying and licencing options, so we’ve listened and created additional pricing options.

Here they are:

If you buy this many credits…      You’ll get this many FREE
Up to 5                                                                                None
5 to 10                                                                                 1
10 to 20                                                                               3
20 to 30                                                                               8

If you think you’ll be running more than 30 projects any time soon, particularly those running usability benchmarking and tracking studies you can get an annual licence for just $14,900.

Single credits still cost USD $350. The new pricing info page can be found here: http://www.loop11.com/pricing/

Keep checking back for new Loop11 updates and news.

Happy Testing!

Which City Council has the best website?

Council websites provide important information on an extensive range of services and information for residents, from pet information to waste collection times and many other community service programs. It is important for council websites to be user friendly and easy to use to enable residents to find the information they need easily.

In this independent study, 600 random participants were asked to complete some simple tasks on 6 of the following council websites:

The following task was asked of 600 participants (100 per website):

“You are a new resident in [City Name] and need to find out what day your household waste will be collected for disposal. Find the page of the website with this information?”

Overall, the Darwin City Council website had the highest usability score with Perth City Council scoring the lowest.

View the full detailed report for task times, clicks, completion rates, satisfaction and more. This case study was conducted using Loop11? and participants were sourced from Mechanical Turk.

Recruiting Participants for Unmoderated, Remote User Testing

Unmoderated, remote user testing tools such as Loop11, provide the ability to target a large number of participants (up to 1000 with Loop11). However, recruiting and incentivizing participants to take part in remote, unmoderated testing can be more challenging than traditional moderated, lab-based testing, particularly if one hasn’t done it before.

A recent article on UXmatters.com breaks down and assesses the pros and cons of each method for recruiting participants for remote and unmoderated testing. The full article can be viewed here.

Happy Testing!

New Feature: Extra Participant Filtering

Last month we added participant filtering to reporting which specifically allowed you to include (or exclude) participants who had not fully completed your user tests.  Today we’ve added to the filtering options to allow you to exclude participants who don’t meet certain quality thresholds.

You can now create thresholds based on the number of seconds they spend and/or the number of clicks they take to complete individual tasks.

Many of you have noted that when you go through your reports there are often numerous participants who do not even leave the home page when attempting a task, but still claim to have ‘completed’ it.

Now, it’s easy to exclude from your reporting these participants who don’t make a proper attempt at completing your user tests.

Similarly, participants who go off to make a cup of tea in the middle of your evaluation can be excluded just as easily so you don’t end up with skewed results.

These filtering options will now give your results much greater accuracy and reliability.

Stay tuned…and happy testing!

Don’t forget to become a Loop11 fan on Facebook and Twitter

Usability Testing On The iPad

There has been a lot of negative commentary on the usability of the iPad since it launched, including Jakob Nielsen’s critique of its usability failings. However, what’s even more important than the usability of the iPad is the usability of YOUR website or app ON the iPad.

There are 5 Million iPad users worldwide…and counting. Many of these people browse the internet using their iPads as well as use apps. It’s also worth mentioning that there are another 50 million iPhone users around the world. So the questions is: How usable is your website or app on the iPad?

You can test the usability of any website on the iPad because Loop11 works beautifully with the iPad. It always has actually. Loop11 can be used on an iPad the same way it works on a computer. Since there is no software for participants to download and no javascript code for you to insert a usability project can be created for the iPad in just a few minutes. We even made a video to prove it!

…and just so you know, you can do it all on an iPhone, as well.

Want to be part of a world first usability study? Here’s your chance.

We created a usability study to see whether there are any differences in behaviour when using the internet on an iPad versus a normal computer. We’d love you to take part. We’ll be publishing the results on our blog soon.

If you have an iPad and would like to be a part of the evaluation, use this link:

iPad users only

If you don’t have an iPad but would like to prove that using a normal computer is waaaay better for surfing the internet than an iPad, go here:

Computer Users Only

Happy testing!

BECU (Boeing Employees’) Credit Union Website

We often sneak a quick look at the projects our members are running and we came across this beauty by the clever guys at the interactive agency Possible, who did some re-design work on the BECU (Boeing Employee’s Credit Union) website (www.becu.org).

Their project was designed to give them the answer to just one question, “What do we call the place where our website visitors go to do their…you know…thingamybob banking that you do when you don’t do it at one of the BECU Neighborhood Financial Centers?”

A very simple project was constructed to get them precisely that one answer. Here’s what they did…

Five different hi-fidelity wireframe designs of the BECU homepage were created and hosted on a staging server. Three designs were identical except for the label to this unnamed section of the website. One placed the link in the primary navigation, rather than the utility navigation at the top, and the final design placed the link in the footer.

The alternative labels for the section were:

  • Remote Account
  • Access Mobile & Online Banking
  • Remote Banking, and
  • Online Banking (for the one in the footer)

Five separate projects were set up so there was no task order bias and the task was worded the same way for each project:

“Use the site to find how to view your banking information using your internet-enabled cell phone.”

During the evalution, when participants selected a link that did not direct them to the ‘correct’ location they were presented with the screen below, which is particularly handy as navigating through a wireframed website where only the home page had any functional purpose could have been disasterously confusing for participants.

Four follow-up questions were asked, again always the same for each project.  They were:

  1. How difficult was it to complete this task?
  2. How certain did you feel that the “[Name of the section]” link would take you to the information you were looking for?
  3. What specific information would you expect to see when you click on ” Name of the section”?
  4. What, if anything, would be a better name or label for this information?

All in all a quick, simple and inexpensive way of getting a precise link label to a section of their website growing in importance.

As for the results of the testing…well, go to www.becu.org to find out which option provided the best experience.

New Feature: Participant Filtering

Today we’re unveiling an exciting new feature to help add more value to your project reporting – participant filtering.

When we first launched Loop11 we made the decision to only show the results of participants who fully completed user tests in the reporting. We had a strong belief (and still do) that participants who do not fully complete user tests are not giving your tasks and questions their best efforts. So we excluded them from reporting altogether.

Since launching we’ve had many, many, many requests from our members to make the results of partially completed user tests available. We listened, and so that’s what we’ve done.

Here’s a bit of a tutorial of how it works:

  •   When you log into your account you will now find in your list of Launched Projects a column titled ‘Participants  Start/Finish’ (as shown below). This indicates the total number of participants who commenced your user test  followed by the total number who completed it.

  •   By default, your reporting will only show you the results of participants who fully complete your user tests. But if you want to change that so you can see the results off all participants up until they drop out of your user test you can now go to Settings, tick the box under ‘Include participants in the reporting that have partially completed  the user test’, then click Save Settings.

  •   In your reporting you’ll now see an indication of the total number of participants who completed each task. The early tasks will always have more as participants drop out of your project.
  •   On the right hand side, we’ve included a Settings Indicator that will always tell you whether you are looking at all participants or completed participants so you don’t have to remember.
  •   NOTE: If you set a quota of 100 participants, for example, your project will still only close after 100 FULLY COMPLETED user tests have been collected.

  •   When you’re analysing participants individually, you’ll also be told which participants were guilty of not fully completing your user test.

In the next couple of weeks we’ll be adding a few more useful features to Settings so you can clean up your data by excluding the results of participants who fall outside certain time-based and click-based thresholds that you can customise.

Stay tuned…and happy testing!

Loop11 Updates: Track participants, Re-categorise multiple URLs, Pop-up invitation control, Improved reporting and more

It’s been a while since we posted an update about Loop11, but we’ve just launched some new features, and we wanted to let you know about them.

Apart from the many minor (oh, alright…and a couple of major) bug fixes we made recently, we’ve also improved the performance of our servers so page load speeds should be faster.

The other key changes include:

Track participants using unique IDs

If you want to track participants so you know who to provide incentives to you can customise the end of the URL with a unique ID for each participant. You can find this new feature in Step 3 – User Test Options and full details of the process here.

Re-Categorise multiple URLs at a time

Instead of re-categorising one URL at a time you can now re-categorise multiple URLs at the same time. You can find this new feature in the reporting of any task.

Pop-up invitation controls

If you are recruiting your participants by intercepting them via your website, you now have a feature allowing you to control the percentage of visitors that you ‘invite’. You can find this new feature in Step 4 – Invite Participants: Create a pop-up invitation for your own website.

Individual participant path analysis in exports

The full path analysis of individual participants was never made available in the exported reports. Don’t ask why. But it is there now.

Individual responses for Rating Scale Matrix questions

The results for rating scale matrix questions, while always available at an aggregated level were never available so you could see the individual participant responses. These can now be found in your reporting under Participants.

Most of these changes have come about from customer feedback. Just give us your opinion and we will happily take it on board!

Happy Testing!

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